Rannach Provincial Grazing Reserve

Rannach

Established: March 10, 1959
Area: 21,324 acres (8629.5 hectares)
Terrain: Gently rolling to moderately rolling slopes with several, strong slopes present
Vegetation: Developed tame pastures and forested areas
Region: Low-aspen parkland ecoregion
Nearby municipalities: 12.8 km east of Two Hills
Water bodies: North Saskatchewan River
Livestock management: Rannach Community Pasture Society
(privatized April 1, 1997)

Maintain all fence lines, dugouts, water wells, one corral system and the buildings located at the headquarters site.

Looks after livestock and maintains the tame pastures in good productive condition.

The grazing association has developed a network of upland watering sites to keep cattle out of dugouts and natural water bodies. Water sources for these sites include the various water wells

Grazing season: Mid-May to mid-October
Cattle: Approximately 2236 cow-calf pairs, 114 yearlings and 78 bulls in an average year
Wildlife and game: Deer
Upland game birds
Waterfowl
Recreational activities: Berry Picking
Bird watching
Hunting
Mushroom picking
Research
Snowmobiling
Industrial activities: Oil and gas production

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, poor quality land in the Rannach district made farming unprofitable. As a result, many of its residents abandoned their farmsteads and left the community, and the County of Two Hills was concerned about its eroded tax base. County officials requested the Department of Lands and Forests to take over this land and negotiate grants in lieu of taxes.

In 1955, the Department, hoping to establish a provincial grazing reserve, began accumulating land in the Rannach district. The Rannach Community Pasture Association was established to deal with operational concerns between the users and the department. The association elected an advisory board to represent its members. Grazing on the reserve began in 1959, with 550 head belonging to 44 patrons

Originally, the reserve consisted of 19,500 acres (7891.4 hectares) of land. Over the years, the Alberta government added additional lands to the original land base by purchasing land from some of the early settlers to the Rannach area. Many homesteading farmers were not successful, proving the lands were very marginal for annual cropping. However, under proper management, the developed tame pastures can provide quality, sustainable grazing. Today the reserve is 21,324 acres (8629.5 hectares)

For more information on grazing cattle on the Rannach Provincial Grazing Reserve, contact:

  • Public Lands Office, St. Paul, Alberta
    Phone: (780) 645-6336

Provincial Grazing Reserves are popular recreational sites for the general public. Following is a list of conditions that need to be adhered to when recreating on the Rannach Provincial Grazing Reserve.

Regulatory Conditions of Recreational Access

Under Sections 9(3) and 9(4) of the Recreational Access Regulation, recreational users must:

  • Not litter;
  • Have direct control of any animal brought onto the agricultural disposition land;
  • Not park vehicles so that they block an approach to land;
  • Not enter or use any building or improvement on the disposition;
  • Not cause any damage to the agricultural disposition land or the property of the disposition holder;
  • Leave gates and other property as they were found;
  • Comply with an applicable recreational management plan, if any; and
  • Comply with the restrictions, prohibitions, terms and conditions, if any, imposed by the Local Settlement Officer, or Director.

Specific Access Conditions for this Disposition

  • LSO conditions – Foot access for recreational purposes is allowed during the grazing season (May 1 to October 31) only in pastures not occupied by livestock.
  • LSO conditions – No access is allowed to pastures where livestock are present.
  • LSO conditions – From November 1 to April 30, motorized vehicles are allowed on developed roads only.
  • LSO condition – Organized recreational groups must obtain a Letter of Authority from the Grazing Reserve office.

For more information, see:

 

Page Information

Updated: Sep 3, 2015